Social Work FAQ


The following are answers to some of the questions school social workers are most frequently asked by parents and students. 

To see the answer to a particular question, simply click any part of the relevant question.
 

School social workers help students, parents and school staff identify needs that interfere with learning, and they work with students to get the services they may need.

School social workers work with both general and special education students to help resolve social, emotional and behavioral problems.

This can be done through assessments, consultation with school staff and community providers, and providing direct or indirect services.

To arrange for your child to see a social worker, contact the social workers at your school and request a form to sign up your child. 

Yes, your child’s teacher can request that a social worker meet with your child. Once a teacher has made the request, the social worker will contact you.

The school social worker can see any student up to four times before written or verbal consent is needed to continue.

The school social worker's schedule may vary by student. Some students may see the social worker on a weekly basis while others may see the social worker as needed or during a crisis situation. 

Confidentiality between the student and the school social worker is important and helps to build a trusting rapport.

The school social worker is not required to call home unless there is a concern for the student's emotional or physical well being.

However, school social workers are mandated reporters. This means they are mandated by the state to report if a student expresses an intent to harm themselves, harm others, or express that someone else has harmed them.

If this happens, appropriate persons are notified to further assist with the situation.