Social Studies Courses & Faculty


Below are descriptions of the social studies courses offered at Elmwood Park High School. To see a listing of social studies faculty, use this link for quick access:

Learn more about our program by visiting Social Studies at EPHS.


Courses


WORLD HISTORY*

CREDIT

GRADE LEVEL

PREREQUISITE

1.0 (two semesters)

9

None

World History is a survey of the most important events, ideas, beliefs, customs and institutions from earliest times to the present. Attention is focused on the growth of freedom and justice in government, but considerable study is given to geography, religion, science, business, fine arts, language, literature, education and family life. The important men and women of every age and nation are studied to see how individuals both shape and are shaped by their society. World History is an important background for an understanding of world affairs and world literature, as well as essential background for understanding United States history.

*This course is offered using a co-taught model for students needing extra support.


AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

CREDIT

GRADE LEVEL

PREREQUISITE

1.0 (two semesters)

9, 10, 11, 12

Teacher recommendation

Advanced Placement Human Geography is a college-level course designed to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use and alteration of the earth's surfaces. Students also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. Specific topics of the course include analysis of maps and spatial data, how political regulations, economics, values and tastes create particular cultural landscapes, how regions came into being and what they reveal about the changing character of the world we live, and how events and processes operating in one place can influence those in other places. All students enrolled in AP Human Geography are required to take the Advanced Placement exam in May.


AP WORLD HISTORY

CREDIT

GRADE LEVEL

PREREQUISITE

1.0 (two semesters)

10

Teacher recommendation

This course provides a broader and more in-depth analysis of the content studied in World History. There is also considerable in-depth study and reading outside the required textbook. Students may also be offered opportunities for field trips as part of their enrichment in the social sciences. All AP World History students must take the Advanced Placement exam in May.


UNITED STATES HISTORY*

CREDIT

GRADE LEVEL

PREREQUISITE

1.0 (two semesters)

11

None

The principal aim of this course is to provide students with the background, knowledge and pride in their American heritage that will prepare and motivate them to discharge their duties and preserve their rights as citizens. The course includes a study of the contributions of various ethnic groups to the growth and development of this state and nation. The course is organized chronologically around the major forces, events and personalities of our history from America's beginnings in Europe to the present. Special attention is focused on the political and economic struggles that led to the Declaration of Independence, our Constitution with its Bill of Rights, the growth of democracy, the settling of the West, the Civil War, the growth of industries, corporations, labor unions, commercialized farms, the rise of cities, social problems and our emergence into world leadership.

*This course is offered using a co-taught model for students needing extra support.


AMERICAN STUDIES — HISTORY

CREDIT

GRADE LEVEL

PREREQUISITE

1.0 (two semesters)

11

English I, English II

American Studies is a two-credit class that consists of a one-credit history course (described here) and a one-credit English course (described in English Courses & Faculty). The class combines the English III curriculum with the United States History curriculum. Students are team-taught over two consecutive periods by an English teacher and a social studies teacher with the idea of blending topics and reinforcing writing and reading skills that overlap in both classes. Topics addressed in the course emphasize the development of American culture, including political, economic and social history as well as American literature. This is a 2.0 credit class, one credit for English and one credit for History.


AP UNITED STATES HISTORY

CREDIT

GRADE LEVEL

PREREQUISITE

1.0 (two semesters)

11

Teacher recommendation

The principal aim of this course is to provide students with the background, knowledge and pride in their American heritage that will prepare and motivate them to discharge their duties and preserve their rights as citizens. The course includes a study of the contributions of various ethnic groups to the growth and development of this state and nation. The depth of study is greater than that of the United States History course, with frequent use of readings outside the text. All students enrolled in AP United States History are required to take the Advanced Placement exam in May.


AP U.S. GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

CREDIT

GRADE LEVEL

PREREQUISITE

0.5 (one semester)

11, 12

None

AP United States Government and Politics introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States. The course examines politically significant concepts and themes, through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning, assess causes and consequences of political events, and interpret data to develop evidence-based arguments. Students will also be required to take and pass the Constitution Test during the course. This course fulfills the civics requirement. All AP U.S. Government and Politics students must take the Advanced Placement exam in May.


AP COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT

CREDIT

GRADE LEVEL

PREREQUISITE

0.5 (one semester)

11, 12

None

Following the College Board’s suggested curriculum designed to parallel college-level comparative government and politics courses, this class offers students an understanding of the world’s diverse political structures and practices. The course encompasses the study of both specific countries and general concepts used to interpret the key political relationships found in virtually all national policies. Course content generally includes sources of public authority and political power, the relationship between states and society, the relationships between the political and institutional frameworks of citizens and states, political change, and comparative methods. All students enrolled in AP Comparative Government are required to take the Advanced Placement exam in May.


INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

CREDIT

GRADE LEVEL

PREREQUISITE

0.5 (one semester)

10, 11, 12

None

Formerly known as Mind and Media, this course introduces students to the study of individual human behavior. Course content typically includes (but is not limited to) an overview of the field of psychology, topics in human growth and development, personality and behavior, and abnormal psychology.


AP PSYCHOLOGY

CREDIT

GRADE LEVEL

PREREQUISITE

0.5 (one semester)

10, 11, 12

Intro to Psychology

Following the College Board's suggested curriculum designed to parallel a college-level psychology course, AP Psychology introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. The course exposes students to each major subfield within psychology and enables students to examine the methods that psychologists use in their science and practice. All students enrolled in AP Psychology are required to take the Advanced Placement exam in May.


INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

CREDIT

GRADE LEVEL

PREREQUISITE

0.5 (one semester)

10, 11, 12

None

As a combination of the former courses Contemporary Problems in American Society and American Culture Since WWII, this class will push students to examine the most pressing issues facing society today, with special emphasis given to challenges facing teens and young adults.


CRIMINAL JUSTICE

 

CREDIT

GRADE LEVEL

PREREQUISITE

0.5 (one semester)

10, 11, 12

None

This course will examine the workings of the U.S. criminal and civil justice systems, including providing an understanding of civil and criminal law and the legal process, the structure and procedures of courts, and the role of various legal or judicial agencies. Course content will also include contemporary problems in the criminal justice system.


SENIOR U.S. GOVERNMENT*

 

CREDIT

GRADE LEVEL

PREREQUISITE

1.0 (one semester)

12

None

This course examines the multiple components of the United States government. Units include foundations of American government and a detailed look into the legislative, executive and judicial branches. Political parties, interest groups, civil rights, elections and voting will also be covered. Students will learn about the State of Illinois and local governments, with an emphasis on civic engagement and political participation.

*This course is offered using a co-taught model for students needing extra support.


Faculty


Anthony Sylvester

Curriculum Leader & Teacher | Social Studies | EPHS

Vanessa Cleys

Teacher | Social Studies | EPHS

Nora O'Mahoney

Teacher | Social Studies | EPHS

Jacquelyn Regnier

Teacher | Social Studies | EPHS

Tina Rogus

Teacher | Social Studies | EPHS

Kimberly Schneider

Teacher | Social Studies | EPHS

Patrick Sheridan

Teacher | Social Studies | EPHS